I Make Up Worlds

SFF/YA writer Kate Elliott

22,735 notes

Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet

↳ F → feminism & representation
"I certainly came up in an era where women were really making strides and making a point to beat down doors and find their place, and crash through the glass ceiling. And a lot of them did that believing that they had to trade on their femininity and that they had to be a man and tap into whatever they believed was a masculine trait to hang in the boys’ room, to get the "keys to the kingdom" as it were. And what’s beautiful about Jessica Pearson is that she is the next level to that when, really, feminism is about being all that you are and not having to trade one thing for another on your way up, or apologize." - Gina Torres (about her character Jessica Pearson, on Suits)

Always reblog Gina Torres

(via sextus--empiricus)

648 notes

sourcedumal:

nationalballet:

Keiichi Hirano was born in Osaka, Japan and trained at the Setsuko Hirano Ballet School. Mr. Hirano joined The National Ballet of Canada in 1999 and was promoted to First Soloist in 2006. 

SHUTTER ITS GOSEI KNIGHT IN HUMAN FORM

sourcedumal:

nationalballet:

Keiichi Hirano was born in Osaka, Japan and trained at the Setsuko Hirano Ballet School. Mr. Hirano joined The National Ballet of Canada in 1999 and was promoted to First Soloist in 2006. 

SHUTTER ITS GOSEI KNIGHT IN HUMAN FORM

(via crossedwires)

6,383 notes

http://medievalpoc.tumblr.com/post/81786434634/theletteraesc-medievalpoc-fuckyeahalejandra

idriveahyundaimovietheatre:

medievalpoc:

whitefriartuck:

theletteraesc:

medievalpoc:

fuckyeahalejandra replied to your post: Ancient Art Week! Various Roman Sculpt…

Are these sculptures of roman citizens or slaves?

The association of Black people with enslavement is an entirely modern invention, as in, chattel slavery in the…

Regarding the whole ‘men hunted, women gave birth’ thing (and wildly off topic from racism in classical Rome, sorry), it is looking increasingly like a load of nonsense (no surprise). 

There are prehistoric hunting scenes showing hunts which (probably *1) show women hunting for one thing and despite this male researcers still declares that men hunted and men created these hunting scenes and were also the first artists. But now we know that these hunting scenes not only show women hunting in some cases but WERE PRODUCED BY WOMEN primarily!

So what evidence for male = hunter is there?

When you look at the evidence for male hunters you have gender bias (men obviously hunted because men hunt now), gender essentialism (men hunted because they had less body fat and didn’t need to produce babies and Reasons) and ethnographic evidence (indigenous Australian hunters were solely male in the 19th-20th centuries).

We assume that because violent activities today are associated with men while women nurtured young that has always been the way. We also assume that women who were not pregnant would be compelled to behave in the same way as women who were pregnant/looking after children. It also assumes that hunting was much more dangerous than it probably was, hunters were often as much scavengers as far as we can tell from archaeological evidence of kill sites and often employed tactics like driving pray off cliffs to die or into dead ends were they could be picked off more safely. That isn’t to say it was completely safe of course. But who is to say gathering was necessarily safe in an age where a simple cut could result in death from infection and there were no anti-bodies for the admittedly few venomous creatures in Europe or that the gatherers would be free from the attentions of now extinct predators.

Much of the ethnographic evidence comes either from African nomadic peoples which have still had thousands of years of contact with patriarchal cultures or Australian Aboriginal and Papua New Guinean groups. The ethnographic observations were made in the 19th and 20th centuries and are deeply racist because they were based on the assumption that these cultures were primitive and unchanging since settlement of Sahul (Australia + New Guinea when they were connected) 50,000 years ago! We know, for example, in the early nineteenth century the power structure of Australian indigenous populations shifted in favour of young men after various epidemics killed 90% of the Aboriginal population in the space of 50 years or thereabout (something we never learnt in school, funnily enough). We do not know who hunted prior to European colonisation of Australia. We guess and the further back in time you go the more problematic that becomes because the hundreds at least indigenous cultures in Australia have all evolved over time just like any other culture.

IF we accept the creators of the hunting scenes across Europe were hunters themselves then we have to accept that women were as likely to be hunters as men. If we do not want to accept that the people who made the art were hunters then we have no evidence beyond ethnographic evidence for males solely being hunters and then we have to look carefully at the ethnographic evidence and accept it is deeply, deeply problematic.

So, in my opinion as a humble archaeology undergraduate, we either accept we have no firm evidence to say men or women hunted, just that hunting was done. If you accepted the cave paintings as evidence of male hunters when they were believed to be produced by men you should also accept they are now evidence of female hunting.

If you think you can say with certainty that ‘women have always been subjected to men because Reasons’ then you have no clue what you are talking about.Sadly much of the scholarship on the subject assumes male = hunter and works forward from that, trying to justify the assumption rather than addressing the actual evidence. Because if we accept that there is no evidence for that then it undermines a lot of nonsense gender essentialism used to handwave away sexism in society today. 

Sources:

Australian Archaeology by Peter Hiscock

Cave paintings created by women

Lectures, seminars, lost media articles etc. 

Image source

*1 Of course it is ‘accepted’ (read: assumed) that all the figures are male by default unless there are obvious feminine traits as opposed to just representing people in general.

Oh my god, I could not have said that nearly as well as you did.

This is such a concise and accessible explanation of why and how so much of what we “know” about the ancient world, prehistory, and a lot of history in general has almost EVERYTHING to do with looking for confirmation of reflections of our CURRENT SOCIETY, and any academic with a lick of honesty will tell you the same thing.

My graduate adviser tells a story about doing her dissertation research in Normandy in the 1970s, where she delved into the civic archives of Caen to study the role of women in early modern commerce. The other academic working there was an older French man (my adviser is an American woman), and he guffawed at her research plans and greatly despised her working there alongside him, a “real” historian studying “serious” history. He insisted repeatedly that there were no women working in commerce in France at that time, and that there were only men.

My adviser soldiered on despite having to work while facing directly at this man every single day. As she began her research, she began finding women “hiding” in plain sight, listed right alongside men in the tax rolls and notarized sales that they were both studying. She found hundreds of women engaging in buying and selling, and happily shoved these documents right in the face of her detractor, who now insisted that these women, who had not existed in his mind the day before, were simply “unimportant”. 

My point: our biases are so powerful that we can literally look at documents and not see the names on the paper, if we believe that those names should not be there. How much of our narrative self-perpetuates, as generations of scholars find support for preexisting biases by simply overlooking the contradictory evidence staring right back at them?


(via medievalpoc)

2,449 notes

I think it was time for men to see what it was like. And this video, on the set as well, made people a little uncomfortable. It was funny to see that. Even though the treatment was the director’s idea, when we were doing the scene where they wash the cars, right? You’ve seen this scene a million times with girls. They’re in a bathing suit, they’re pouring water on themselves — you’ve seen it in movies even. You’ve seen it everywhere. They’re pouring water and suds all over themselves, they’re rubbing their boobs on the car, the whole thing. When we were doing this with the guys, the crew, the director — and he’ll admit this too — and the guys who had to do it after one take were like, “Well I think that’s enough. I think, you know, that’s cool.” I was like, “No!” Because if a girl were doing this right now, we’d be shooting it for an hour! Meanwhile we’ve done one take and you’re like, “That’s good.” I was like, “No, it’s not good! Rub your butt on the car!” It’s supposed to be funny, people have to get the joke, but they also have to see what it’s like. How absurd it is to do things like that. I asked the guys, “You feel absurd right now? Yes? Good, then we’re doing it right. Now rub your chest on the car and let’s go.” [laughs]
For me it was like, I just wanted them to see what it feels like. I wasn’t trying to have some big political conversation about it, but I am trying to say think about what you do.
Jennifer Lopez, when asked about “I Luh Ya Papi” in this interview (via yah-booty)

(via ionsfolly)

164,679 notes

animedavidbowie:

unrecognizedpotential:

forgottenawesome:

Do You Love Someone With Depression?
If you have a partner or are close to someone who struggles with depression, you may not always know how to show them you love them. One day they may seem fine, and the next they are sad, distant and may push you away. It is important that you know that as a person who is close to them and trusted by them, you can help your friend or partner have shorter, less severe bouts of depression. Mental illness is as real as physical illness (it is physical actually, read more about that here) and your partner needs you as much as they would need to be cared for if they had the flu.
Your relationship may seem one-sided during these times, but by helping your partner through a very difficult and painful affliction, you are strengthening your relationship and their mental health in the long term.
1. Help them keep clutter at bay.
When a person begins spiraling into depression, they may feel like they are slowing down while the world around them speeds up. The mail may end up in stacks, dishes can pile up in the sink, laundry may go undone as the depressed person begins to feel more and more overwhelmed by their daily routine and unable to keep up. By giving your partner some extra help sorting mail, washing dishes or using paper plates and keeping chaos in check in general, you’ll be giving them (and yourself) the gift of a calm  environment. (I’m a fan of the minimalist movement because of this, you can read more about that here.)
2. Fix them a healthy meal.
Your partner may do one of two things when they are in a depressed state. They may eat very little, or they may overeat. In either case, they may find that driving through a fast food restaurant or ordering a pizza online is just easier than fixing a meal. Eating like this, or neglecting to eat will only degrade your partner’s health, causing them to go deeper into their depression. Help your loved one keep their body healthy, and their mind will follow. This is a great article that talks about the “Brain Diet” which can help the symptoms of depression, and this article talks about how our modern diet could contribute to the recent rise in depression. Here is a recipe for a trail mix that is quick to make and has mood-boosting properties.
3.Get them outside.
 The benefits of getting outside for a depressed person are huge. And it is possibly the last thing on earth your partner will want to do. Take them to be somewhere in nature. Pack a picnic and lie in the sun, take a leisurely hike or plant a garden. Being barefoot in the dirt, or “earthing” helps ground the body and reverse the effects of living in a world of emf’s, and digging in soil can actually act as an antidepressant, as a strain of bacterium in soil, Mycobacterium vaccae, triggers the release of seratonin, which in turn elevates mood and decreases anxiety. Sunshine increases Vitamin D production which can help alleviate depression. My friend Elizabeth wrote an excellent post about Vitamin D and its link to depression here.  For more information about other sources of Vitamin D, this is a great post as well as this.
4. Ask them to help you understand what they’re feeling.
If your partner is able to articulate what they are going through, it will help them and you better understand what you are dealing with, and may give insight into a plan of action for helping your partner. Also, feeling alone is common for a depressed person and anything that combats that feeling will help alleviate the severity and length of the depression.
5. Encourage them to focus on self-care.
Depressed people often stop taking care of themselves. Showering, getting haircuts, going to the doctor or dentist, it’s all just too hard, and they don’t deserve to be well taken care of anyway in their minds. This can snowball quickly into greater feelings of worthlessness since “Now I’m such a mess, no one could ever love me”. Help your loved one by being proactive. Tell them “I’m going to do the dishes, why don’t you go enjoy a bubble bath?” can give them the permission they won’t give themselves to do something normal, healthy and self-loving.
6. Hug them.
Studies show that a sincere hug that lasts longer than 20 seconds can release feel-good chemicals in the brain and elevate the mood of the giver and receiver. Depressed people often don’t want to be touched, but a sincere hug with no expectation of anything further can give your partner a lift.
7. Laugh with them.
Telling a silly joke, watching a comedy or seeing a stand up comedian will encourage your partner to laugh in spite of themselves. Laughing releases endorphins and studies show can actually counteract symptoms of depression and anxiety.
8. Reassure them that you can handle their feelings.
Your partner may be feeling worthless, angry and even guilty while they are depressed. They may be afraid that they will end up alone because no one will put up with their episodes forever. Reassure them that you are in the relationship for the long haul and they won’t scare you away because they have an illness.
9. Challenge their destructive thoughts.
A depressed person’s mind can be a never-ending loop of painful, destructive thoughts. “I’m unlovable, I’m a failure, I’m ugly, I’m stupid”. Challenge these untruths with the truth. “You’re not unlovable, I love you. You aren’t a failure, here are all the things you’ve accomplished.”
10.Remind them why you love them.
Look at pictures of happy times you’ve had together. Tell them your favorite things about them. Reminisce about your relationship and all the positive things that have happened, and remind your partner that you love them and they will get through this.
(via The Darling Bakers)

More people need to know this.

This is so incredibly important. I’ve seen people with depression ostracized so many times, and I cannot stress how much it means to each and every person I’ve tried to reach out to after whatever “falling-outs” they’ve had due to depression. Remember to always be compassionate and kind to all friends like this, because you never know what they’re going through.

animedavidbowie:

unrecognizedpotential:

forgottenawesome:

Do You Love Someone With Depression?

If you have a partner or are close to someone who struggles with depression, you may not always know how to show them you love them. One day they may seem fine, and the next they are sad, distant and may push you away. It is important that you know that as a person who is close to them and trusted by them, you can help your friend or partner have shorter, less severe bouts of depression. Mental illness is as real as physical illness (it is physical actually, read more about that here) and your partner needs you as much as they would need to be cared for if they had the flu.

Your relationship may seem one-sided during these times, but by helping your partner through a very difficult and painful affliction, you are strengthening your relationship and their mental health in the long term.

1. Help them keep clutter at bay.

When a person begins spiraling into depression, they may feel like they are slowing down while the world around them speeds up. The mail may end up in stacks, dishes can pile up in the sink, laundry may go undone as the depressed person begins to feel more and more overwhelmed by their daily routine and unable to keep up. By giving your partner some extra help sorting mail, washing dishes or using paper plates and keeping chaos in check in general, you’ll be giving them (and yourself) the gift of a calm  environment. (I’m a fan of the minimalist movement because of this, you can read more about that here.)

2. Fix them a healthy meal.

Your partner may do one of two things when they are in a depressed state. They may eat very little, or they may overeat. In either case, they may find that driving through a fast food restaurant or ordering a pizza online is just easier than fixing a meal. Eating like this, or neglecting to eat will only degrade your partner’s health, causing them to go deeper into their depression. Help your loved one keep their body healthy, and their mind will follow. This is a great article that talks about the “Brain Diet” which can help the symptoms of depression, and this article talks about how our modern diet could contribute to the recent rise in depression. Here is a recipe for a trail mix that is quick to make and has mood-boosting properties.

3.Get them outside.

 The benefits of getting outside for a depressed person are huge. And it is possibly the last thing on earth your partner will want to do. Take them to be somewhere in nature. Pack a picnic and lie in the sun, take a leisurely hike or plant a garden. Being barefoot in the dirt, or “earthing” helps ground the body and reverse the effects of living in a world of emf’s, and digging in soil can actually act as an antidepressant, as a strain of bacterium in soil, Mycobacterium vaccae, triggers the release of seratonin, which in turn elevates mood and decreases anxiety. Sunshine increases Vitamin D production which can help alleviate depression. My friend Elizabeth wrote an excellent post about Vitamin D and its link to depression here.  For more information about other sources of Vitamin D, this is a great post as well as this.

4. Ask them to help you understand what they’re feeling.

If your partner is able to articulate what they are going through, it will help them and you better understand what you are dealing with, and may give insight into a plan of action for helping your partner. Also, feeling alone is common for a depressed person and anything that combats that feeling will help alleviate the severity and length of the depression.

5. Encourage them to focus on self-care.

Depressed people often stop taking care of themselves. Showering, getting haircuts, going to the doctor or dentist, it’s all just too hard, and they don’t deserve to be well taken care of anyway in their minds. This can snowball quickly into greater feelings of worthlessness since “Now I’m such a mess, no one could ever love me”. Help your loved one by being proactive. Tell them “I’m going to do the dishes, why don’t you go enjoy a bubble bath?” can give them the permission they won’t give themselves to do something normal, healthy and self-loving.

6. Hug them.

Studies show that a sincere hug that lasts longer than 20 seconds can release feel-good chemicals in the brain and elevate the mood of the giver and receiver. Depressed people often don’t want to be touched, but a sincere hug with no expectation of anything further can give your partner a lift.

7. Laugh with them.

Telling a silly joke, watching a comedy or seeing a stand up comedian will encourage your partner to laugh in spite of themselves. Laughing releases endorphins and studies show can actually counteract symptoms of depression and anxiety.

8. Reassure them that you can handle their feelings.

Your partner may be feeling worthless, angry and even guilty while they are depressed. They may be afraid that they will end up alone because no one will put up with their episodes forever. Reassure them that you are in the relationship for the long haul and they won’t scare you away because they have an illness.

9. Challenge their destructive thoughts.

A depressed person’s mind can be a never-ending loop of painful, destructive thoughts. “I’m unlovable, I’m a failure, I’m ugly, I’m stupid”. Challenge these untruths with the truth. “You’re not unlovable, I love you. You aren’t a failure, here are all the things you’ve accomplished.”

10.Remind them why you love them.

Look at pictures of happy times you’ve had together. Tell them your favorite things about them. Reminisce about your relationship and all the positive things that have happened, and remind your partner that you love them and they will get through this.

(via The Darling Bakers)

More people need to know this.

This is so incredibly important. I’ve seen people with depression ostracized so many times, and I cannot stress how much it means to each and every person I’ve tried to reach out to after whatever “falling-outs” they’ve had due to depression. Remember to always be compassionate and kind to all friends like this, because you never know what they’re going through.

(via jhameia)

51 notes

sihaya13 asked: Hi Kate, I know you've commented quite a bit on resistance to imperialism, particularly the resistance of women (for example through art and craft), and I was just wondering if you knew of any good academic sources on the issue. I'm writing an essay for university, and would be very appreciative of any help you could offer. Thank you!

starlady38:

kateelliottsff:


This is a great question that I cannot possibly go into at the depth it deserves so let me just say a few things, aided by some comments by my spouse whose academic area of interest includes militarism and empire.

As he says: Any empire has resistance against it.

He suggests focusing your search geographically, temporally, and/or according to what aspect(s) of resistance you might want to investigate (military, ideological, religious, economic, political, language, legal traditions, cultural traditions, arts and crafts and music, and so on). One book he recommends in this more general sense is Michael Mann’s The Sources of Social Power (Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition 2012). Another general reader is EMPIReS, ed by Susan E Alcock, Terence N D’Altroy, Kathleen D Morrison, Carla M Sinopoli (Cambridge University Press, 2001) that includes articles like “Coercion, resistance, and hierarchy: local processes and imperial strategies in the Vijayanagara empire.”

I mention these two because they are on our shelves. It’s important to look for work that comes out of the indigenous population itself (although it is generally easier to find books and articles by outside academics who work within the Western university system).

Geographically and temporally one can find examples of resistance to empire from all over the world. For example the famous Rosetta Stone refers to the “Great Rebellion,” a resistance of indigenous Egyptians against their Ptolemaic rulers, over 2000 years ago. The history of the Roman Empire can be flipped and read as a history of resistance to Roman expansion, although it can be difficult to get the other side of the story since most of our records come from the Roman perspective. There was significant local resistance to the Mongol expansion (rarely successful during the initial conquest). Again, any empire wherever & whenever it might be will offer case studies depending on what sources you can get at your university library. Partly this depends (as above) on what aspect, time, or place you want to examine, so it is possible that the first thing you want to do is narrow down your subject.

Here are a few examples of academic works that we have on our shelves that are at least tangentially related to the topic. I don’t specifically suggest you use them; they are examples to give an idea of what can be found out there.

Matthew Restall’s Maya Conquistador (Beacon Press 1998) uses Maya sources to examine the conquest of the Yucatan Peninsula and regions south of central Mexico by the Spaniards. “This is more a story of survival, of a society whose vitality and complexity reconstituted itself not just in a singular post-Conquest moment but over and over again in numerous ways as it adapted to the colonial experience that was the Conquest’s outcome.” (pp xiii-xiv).

If you read a language other than the English this is written in, look for works published by in the country of origin (possibly available through Inter Library Loan) such as Lucḩa y resistencia indígena en el México colonial by Silvia Soriano Hernández (UNAM, 1994).

Mesoamerica is a good example of how the study of resistance to empire changes across time, since before the Spanish Conquest there were indigenous empires (such as the Aztecs aka the Mexica) who during their periods of expansion were resisted by other indigenous groups. For example my spouse’s dissertation is titled: ‪A Study of the Late Postclassic Aztec-Tarascan Frontier in Northern Guerrero, México (Jay SIlverstein, The Pennsylvania State University, 2000).

I have some recent titles relating to the Caribbean and the Atlantic because of research I did for the Spiritwalker Trilogy. Indigenous Resurgence in the Contemporary Caribbean: Amerindian Survival and Revivial ed by Maximilian C Forte (Peter Lang, 2006) has a more modern focus but is quite interesting and has lots of references. Laurant DuBois’s work on revolution and emancipation (especially among slave populations) in the Caribbean and Black Atlantic is good.

I love to point people to this important essay on cultural resistance by George Kanehele on the Hawaiian Renaissance (published in May 1979):
"For if anything is worth celebrating, it is that we are still alive, that our culture has survived the onslaughts of change during the past 200 years. Indeed, not only has it survived, it is now thriving.


Obviously indigenous resistance to colonialism is an equally large and over-lapping (but not exactly the same) subject. Rochita Loenen-Ruiz writes about colonialism in her essays (she’s doing a series for Strange Horizons).



Too often I think imperial expansion is seen (or depicted) as a set of one-way streets: The expansion out, followed some time later by the collapse in. The situation is usually far more complicated. Resistance can go on for generations and in multiple ways.

I’m sorry I haven’t been able to track down any specific references to women’s arts and crafts as forms of resistance, but if anyone has references please append them (and my thanks).

If you’re looking for modern stuff, I would imagine that you can probably find material on arts and crafts specifically as part of the construction of women as bearers of “tradition” while men were constructed as bearers of “modernity,” which is a common feature of colonial modernity as colonial nationalism takes root.

Reblogging to highlight this comment.

10 notes

beyondvictoriana asked: Can you give this a boost for me? Looking for queer, trans* & POC actors for A KISS IN THE DREAM HOUSE, a new play in NYC written by my partner Ashley Rogers. Auditions are next week, and we're trying to spread the word far & wide. Thanks so much for any support you can offer! beyondvictoriana(.)tumblr(.)com/post/78877721346/unpaid-casting-in-nyc-cisgender-vietnamese-women-and

Signal boosting this! Please Boost if you feel so inclined!

51 notes

sihaya13 asked: Hi Kate, I know you've commented quite a bit on resistance to imperialism, particularly the resistance of women (for example through art and craft), and I was just wondering if you knew of any good academic sources on the issue. I'm writing an essay for university, and would be very appreciative of any help you could offer. Thank you!


This is a great question that I cannot possibly go into at the depth it deserves so let me just say a few things, aided by some comments by my spouse whose academic area of interest includes militarism and empire.

As he says: Any empire has resistance against it.

He suggests focusing your search geographically, temporally, and/or according to what aspect(s) of resistance you might want to investigate (military, ideological, religious, economic, political, language, legal traditions, cultural traditions, arts and crafts and music, and so on). One book he recommends in this more general sense is Michael Mann’s The Sources of Social Power (Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition 2012). Another general reader is EMPIReS, ed by Susan E Alcock, Terence N D’Altroy, Kathleen D Morrison, Carla M Sinopoli (Cambridge University Press, 2001) that includes articles like “Coercion, resistance, and hierarchy: local processes and imperial strategies in the Vijayanagara empire.”

I mention these two because they are on our shelves. It’s important to look for work that comes out of the indigenous population itself (although it is generally easier to find books and articles by outside academics who work within the Western university system).

Geographically and temporally one can find examples of resistance to empire from all over the world. For example the famous Rosetta Stone refers to the “Great Rebellion,” a resistance of indigenous Egyptians against their Ptolemaic rulers, over 2000 years ago. The history of the Roman Empire can be flipped and read as a history of resistance to Roman expansion, although it can be difficult to get the other side of the story since most of our records come from the Roman perspective. There was significant local resistance to the Mongol expansion (rarely successful during the initial conquest). Again, any empire wherever & whenever it might be will offer case studies depending on what sources you can get at your university library. Partly this depends (as above) on what aspect, time, or place you want to examine, so it is possible that the first thing you want to do is narrow down your subject.

Here are a few examples of academic works that we have on our shelves that are at least tangentially related to the topic. I don’t specifically suggest you use them; they are examples to give an idea of what can be found out there.

Matthew Restall’s Maya Conquistador (Beacon Press 1998) uses Maya sources to examine the conquest of the Yucatan Peninsula and regions south of central Mexico by the Spaniards. “This is more a story of survival, of a society whose vitality and complexity reconstituted itself not just in a singular post-Conquest moment but over and over again in numerous ways as it adapted to the colonial experience that was the Conquest’s outcome.” (pp xiii-xiv).

If you read a language other than the English this is written in, look for works published by in the country of origin (possibly available through Inter Library Loan) such as Lucḩa y resistencia indígena en el México colonial by Silvia Soriano Hernández (UNAM, 1994).

Mesoamerica is a good example of how the study of resistance to empire changes across time, since before the Spanish Conquest there were indigenous empires (such as the Aztecs aka the Mexica) who during their periods of expansion were resisted by other indigenous groups. For example my spouse’s dissertation is titled: ‪A Study of the Late Postclassic Aztec-Tarascan Frontier in Northern Guerrero, México (Jay SIlverstein, The Pennsylvania State University, 2000).

I have some recent titles relating to the Caribbean and the Atlantic because of research I did for the Spiritwalker Trilogy. Indigenous Resurgence in the Contemporary Caribbean: Amerindian Survival and Revivial ed by Maximilian C Forte (Peter Lang, 2006) has a more modern focus but is quite interesting and has lots of references. Laurant DuBois’s work on revolution and emancipation (especially among slave populations) in the Caribbean and Black Atlantic is good.

I love to point people to this important essay on cultural resistance by George Kanehele on the Hawaiian Renaissance (published in May 1979):
"For if anything is worth celebrating, it is that we are still alive, that our culture has survived the onslaughts of change during the past 200 years. Indeed, not only has it survived, it is now thriving.


Obviously indigenous resistance to colonialism is an equally large and over-lapping (but not exactly the same) subject. Rochita Loenen-Ruiz writes about colonialism in her essays (she’s doing a series for Strange Horizons).



Too often I think imperial expansion is seen (or depicted) as a set of one-way streets: The expansion out, followed some time later by the collapse in. The situation is usually far more complicated. Resistance can go on for generations and in multiple ways.

I’m sorry I haven’t been able to track down any specific references to women’s arts and crafts as forms of resistance, but if anyone has references please append them (and my thanks).

941 notes

I do not see Neil Gaiman getting chased around and called a plagiarist like I was this summer when I wrote three words which also appear in the Hunger Games! (And before that, as it turns out, in The Emperor’s New Groove. Llamas, sue the Hunger Games!)

I am very tired of seeing women insulted for things every dude in the world is allowed to do. It is not literary critique. It is violent misogyny.

Holy shit, Sarah Rees Brennan is on FIRE. The whole glorious indelible mic-drop of an essay is here. (via katrosenfield)

I linked to this once already and I am more than happy to link to it again and again and again.

(via ktempest)

1,817 notes

There is a strange emptiness to life without myths.

I am African American — by which I mean, a descendant of slaves, rather than a descendant of immigrants who came here willingly and with lives more or less intact. My ancestors were the unwilling, unintact ones: children torn from parents, parents torn from elders, people torn from roots, stories torn from language. Past a certain point, my family’s history just… stops. As if there was nothing there.

I could do what others have done, and attempt to reconstruct this lost past. I could research genealogy and genetics, search for the traces of myself in moldering old sale documents and scanned images on microfiche. I could also do what members of other cultures lacking myths have done: steal. A little BS about Atlantis here, some appropriation of other cultures’ intellectual property there, and bam! Instant historically-justified superiority. Worked great for the Nazis, new and old. Even today, white people in my neck of the woods call themselves “Caucasian”, most of them little realizing that the term and its history are as constructed as anything sold in the fantasy section of a bookstore.

These are proven strategies, but I have no interest in them. They’ll tell me where I came from, but not what I really want to know: where I’m going. To figure that out, I make shit up.

Fantasy author N.K. Jemisin in “Dreaming Awake”, a essay from her blog.

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msagara:

shanerebenschied:

Cast in Flame (The Chronicles of Elantra)
It’s always a pleasure to work on one of Michelle Sagara's books with tons of rich visuals to pull from and this latest one, Cast in Flame, is no exception. I had a great time working on this one as always, with the continually amazing Kathleen Oudit at Harlequin Mira.
Read more about this book on Amazon | Goodreads.

One of my favorite things about cover reveal time is seeing the art without the type (i.e. no title, no logo, no author name). I actually love the finished cover as well - but seeing just the art makes it look like … art.


This is a gorgeous illustration.

msagara:

shanerebenschied:

Cast in Flame (The Chronicles of Elantra)

It’s always a pleasure to work on one of Michelle Sagara's books with tons of rich visuals to pull from and this latest one, Cast in Flame, is no exception. I had a great time working on this one as always, with the continually amazing Kathleen Oudit at Harlequin Mira.

Read more about this book on Amazon | Goodreads.

One of my favorite things about cover reveal time is seeing the art without the type (i.e. no title, no logo, no author name). I actually love the finished cover as well - but seeing just the art makes it look like … art.

This is a gorgeous illustration.