I Make Up Worlds

Jul 22

openroadmedia:

Can’t go to #LonCon but have questions for authors? @swordandlaser will ask Kate Elliott, Simon R. Green, and more! 
Pose your questions here: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/1892636-s-l-and-open-road-head-to-loncon-3

Signal boosting.

openroadmedia:

Can’t go to #LonCon but have questions for authors? @swordandlaser will ask Kate Elliott, Simon R. Green, and more!

Pose your questions here: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/1892636-s-l-and-open-road-head-to-loncon-3

Signal boosting.

Jul 16

[video]

Jul 15

juliedillon:

Imagined Realms: Book 1
I have launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund the first issue of Imagined Realms, an annual art publication featuring positive and diverse representations of women in fantasy and science fiction. Each book will feature 10 exclusive and new illustrations created by me specifically for the book.  

Available for purchase are the printed books, 6”x8” and 11”x14” print packs that have all 10 illustrations, limited edition fine art giclees, and a downloadable process video showing my digital painting method. 
Please check it out and spread the word! 


I have backed this fantastic project! Check it out!

juliedillon:

Imagined Realms: Book 1

I have launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund the first issue of Imagined Realms, an annual art publication featuring positive and diverse representations of women in fantasy and science fiction. Each book will feature 10 exclusive and new illustrations created by me specifically for the book.  

Available for purchase are the printed books, 6”x8” and 11”x14” print packs that have all 10 illustrations, limited edition fine art giclees, and a downloadable process video showing my digital painting method. 

Please check it out and spread the word! 

I have backed this fantastic project! Check it out!

Jul 09

medievalpoc:

For those of you who’ve asked how you can support Medievalpoc:
 Become a Medievalpoc Patron!
Medievalpoc is a collection of art, history, and academic resources accessible to anyone. Ph.D. candidates, history educators, fantasy authors, fans of historical media and cultural studies, as well as those who are just interested in learning something different have found new and exciting information at Medievalpoc. These artworks and documentation are readily available on multiple social media platforms, including Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, and Medievalpoc.org. The goal of Medievalpoc is not to hoard information, but to share it as widely as possible and incite discussion in social as well as activist and educational communities.
Patronage will provide the opportunity to not only bring Medievalpoc to a wider audience online, but the ability to travel for appearances at academic and literary conventions, speak at functions, and facilitate activist work in face-to-face environments. Patronage means more access to databases, art collections, and academic resources for the creation of Medievalpoc. In addition, your patronage can pave the way for exciting new projects across various media, like print, film, and interactive online content—projects Patrons can see in the making.I look forward to forging a new era of Patron and Creator with my readers in my goal of bringing Art and History to life in a new way-a History in which we can see ourselves.



I became a Medievalpoc Patron and wanted to signal boost this.

When people complain about “revisionist history” what they don’t tell you is that the “default history” so many were taught in school—the one that leaves out PoC, the one that leaves out women, the one that leaves out the ways in which indigenous people fought back, adapted, co-opted and SURVIVED—is the true revisionist history.
For me a project like medievalpoc and all the people writing and educating about the full panoply of history is part of RESTORATIVE HISTORY. We have always been here.

medievalpoc:

For those of you who’ve asked how you can support Medievalpoc:

Become a Medievalpoc Patron!

Medievalpoc is a collection of art, history, and academic resources accessible to anyone. Ph.D. candidates, history educators, fantasy authors, fans of historical media and cultural studies, as well as those who are just interested in learning something different have found new and exciting information at Medievalpoc. These artworks and documentation are readily available on multiple social media platforms, including Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, and Medievalpoc.org. The goal of Medievalpoc is not to hoard information, but to share it as widely as possible and incite discussion in social as well as activist and educational communities.

Patronage will provide the opportunity to not only bring Medievalpoc to a wider audience online, but the ability to travel for appearances at academic and literary conventions, speak at functions, and facilitate activist work in face-to-face environments. Patronage means more access to databases, art collections, and academic resources for the creation of Medievalpoc. In addition, your patronage can pave the way for exciting new projects across various media, like print, film, and interactive online content—projects Patrons can see in the making.

I look forward to forging a new era of Patron and Creator with my readers in my goal of bringing Art and History to life in a new way-a History in which we can see ourselves.

I became a Medievalpoc Patron and wanted to signal boost this.

When people complain about “revisionist history” what they don’t tell you is that the “default history” so many were taught in school—the one that leaves out PoC, the one that leaves out women, the one that leaves out the ways in which indigenous people fought back, adapted, co-opted and SURVIVED—is the true revisionist history.

For me a project like medievalpoc and all the people writing and educating about the full panoply of history is part of RESTORATIVE HISTORY. We have always been here.

Coming your way in 2015 from Taychon

tachyonpub:

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Cover by Julie Dillon.

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Cover by Elizabeth Story.

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Cover by Thomas Canty.

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Cover by Elizabeth Story.

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Cover by Lius Lasahido.

Obviously I love the Julie Dillon cover, but I must say that Tachyon has gorgeous covers with such variety!

Jul 04

delphae said: Recently you posted a statistics that showed the percentage of different races portrayed in children's books. I have a difficult time believing that 93 % of the books portrayed white people. I don't dispute that minorities have are portrayed in such small percentages. I teach preschool and most of my students are minorities and I struggle to find books that portray children like them. However, were they only looking at books that contain human characters?

medievalpoc:

Apparently you’re not alone in this reaction, although it seems pretty reaching to me.  I think what you’re asking about “human characters” might have something to do with what’s covered here at the CCBlogC:

There has been a lively discussion going on over at Read Roger, prompted by Lee & Low asking why the number of multicultural books has stagnated for the past 18 years. Roger remarked:

Semi-facetious response: While the blog states the disparity between the non-white population in this country (37% of the whole) and the percentage of children’s books with “multicultural content” (hovering around 10% over the last eighteen years), I want to know what percentage of children’s books are in the first place about people (as opposed to talking rabbits or outer space, for example). Things may look worse than they are.

Since the CCBC is the source of the multicultural statistics that have been widely quoted since USA Today first used them in a  feature article back in 1989, I decided to respond to Roger will some hard data. I took a look at the children’s and young adult trade books we have received so far in 2013 here at the CCBC. I  counted the total number of books we have received, noting how many were about people, and how many were about nonhuman characters. I also counted how many were about white people and how many were about people of color. I was generous in my assessment: if a cover with a crowd of kids showed two or more kids of color, I counted it as multicultural. Similarly, if a cover showed two people and one was a person of color, I counted it as multicultural. I was struck by how many middle-grade fiction books show three kids on the cover, a la Harry Potter, all of them white.

[..]

The really dismal numbers come with fiction, both middle grade and young adult. Anyone who is up on trends in children’s and young adult book publishing knows that fiction (a/k/a chapter books and novels) make up the bulk of what is currently being published. Our stats so far for 2013 bear this out. We have received 682 works of fiction to date this year, which makes up 45.19% of our total. Just 32 of them are about non-human protagonists (Most of these were animals; I only counted paranormals if there was no interaction with mortals in the story.)  That means 95.3% of all fiction titles are about human beings. Of the 650 books about human beings, 614 feature white characters, and just 36 feature people of color as main characters. That amounts to just 5.27% of the total. 

So to get back to Roger’s semi-facetious response, here is the big picture. Of the 1509 books published in 2013 that we have received so far, 1183 (or 78.3%) are about human beings. If we subtract the 326 books about nonhuman characters from the overall total and just figure the percentages of books about people of color among the books with human characters only, we still get a fairly dismal number: of the 1183 books published so far in 2013 about human beings, 124 of those books feature people of color. That’s 10.48%. We’re only half way through the publishing year and the fall season is usually the heaviest, but it still looks like we are on track for yet another year of stagnation.

So in other words:

and just 36 feature people of color as main characters. That amounts to just 5.27% of the total. 

It seems that if we’re talking main characters in fiction (and this is Fiction Week), it’s actually worse. Which might explain why you’re having such a hard time finding them. :|

“When we took Shakespeare’s ‘Measure for Measure’ into a maximum security woman’s prison on the West Side…there’s a scene there where a young woman is told by a very powerful official that ‘If you sleep with me, I will pardon your brother. And if you don’t sleep with me, I’ll execute him.’ And he leaves the stage. And this character, Isabel, turned out to the audience and said: ‘To whom should I complain?’ And a woman in the audience shouted: ‘The Police!’ And then she looked right at that woman and said: ‘If I did relate this, who would believe me?’ And the woman answered back, ‘No one, girl.’ And it was astonishing because not only was it an amazing sense of connection between the audience and the actress, but you also realized that this was a kind of an historical lesson in theater reception. That’s what must have happened at The Globe. These soliloquies were not simply monologues that people spoke, they were call and response to the audience. And you realized that vibrancy, that that sense of connectedness is not only what makes theatre great in prisons, it’s what makes theatre great, period.” — Oskar Eustis on ArtBeat Nation (he told the same story on Charlie Rose)

(Source: neverwasastoryofmorewhoa, via fozmeadows)

Jul 03

THE VERY BEST OF KATE ELLIOT is varied and finely crafted

tachyonpub:

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On his More Red Ink blog, editor Marty Halpern writes about his current assignment, The Very Best of Kate Elliott.

The beauty of any “best of” collection is that it allows the reader to experience the full expanse of the author’s writing and story telling. And, if the collection is indeed worth its (literal) weight, then the book will hopefully have some small treasure, a story unfamiliar to the reader, even if the reader is one of the author’s biggest fans. That was true of The Very Best of Tad Williams (see my November 13, 2013 blog post); and it holds true on my most recent project, The Very Best of Kate Elliott, both from Tachyon Publications.

Read More

This is a lovely post whose kind words I much appreciate, but I’m actually re-blogging this because I cannot get over how unbelievably fabulous this piece by Julie Dillon is — no matter how many times I see it and even though it is my wall paper on my desktop AND I have a framed print of it hanging in my house AS WELL (you can get a framed print also at Julie’s INPRNT store), it just blows me away the way she uses color, light, and the flow of line to spectacular effect.

Jul 01

[video]

Diverse Books: Don’t Categorize as “Special Interest” -

This post by Ellen Oh is absolutely on point.

(Source: diversityinya, via medievalpoc)

Jun 30

“The ideal is to be able to read a story in which women are present all the way from the protagonist to multiple secondary and minor characters, and that their interactions with each other are as important as their interactions with men.” — Kate Elliott, at the Bookwars:
http://thebookwars.wordpress.com/2014/06/26/author-interview-kate-elliott/ (via princejvstin)

Jun 27

[video]

Jun 26

[video]

Co-Review: Cold Steel by Kate Elliott -

ladybusinessplus:

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Renay: BEE.

I think what I love about Bee is that it’s very clear throughout the book that although her story crosses and intersects with Cat’s and we don’t see much of it except in reflection, she still has a rich, complicated storyline of her own. She has her own power, both…

If reblogging a really insightful AND FUN review of one of my books is wrong, then I don’t want to be right.

Author Interview: Kate Elliott

thebookwars:

Author Interview: Kate Elliott

So Kate Elliott is one of my favourite authors and she graciously accepted an interview for The Book Wars as it is fantasy month and she does write fantasy.

Kate ElliottAs a child in rural Oregon, Kate Elliott made up stories because she longed to escape to a world of lurid adventure fiction. She now writes fantasy, steampunk, and science fiction, often with a romantic edge. It should therefore come as no…

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